Wisdom from Books

<b>Wisdom from Books</b>
Stephen Lau's website to help you get the wisdom to live as if everything is a miracle!

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Walking to Protect Your Brain


Walking is one of the most common exercises because it is simple and easy to do—you just walk. Sometimes you have to exercise your feet simply because you have to get to some place to do something or to get what you want. In addition to reaping the benefits of exercise, walking can also protect your brain from aging—if you have the know-how.

Most of us just walk with our feet, but without fully utilizing the exercise of walking. That is to say, because walking is so automatic and mechanical that we no long pay any attention to our walking. In other words, we don’t concentrate when we are walking or doing the exercise of walking. We are so caught up with our destination—such as attending a meeting, or going shopping—that we are completely oblivious of the process of walking. Even if we are using walking as an exercise, we may become caught up in listening to music on the MP3 or talking to someone on the cell phone, such that we pay no attention to the movements of our feet because we have put them on automatic pilot.


If you are walking like the above scenarios, your are not helping to protect your brain from aging. As you age, your brain's cognitive functions also decline, such as you experience more memory lapses and you find it more difficult to learn new things. We are living in an age of speed, which creates a compulsive mind; unfortunately, a compulsive mind ages faster. The explanation is simple: like the body, a mind needs a break. If you overexert your body, it breaks down, and so does a mind that never rests. 

The only way to still a mind is by way of concentration: concentrating on something automatic and spontaneous, or something insignificant. The objective of the concentration is to distract the mind from thinking, which we don't stop, except when we are sleeping. Even when we are deep in sleep, the mind continues to work in a passive way to weave out dreams or nightmares. Therefore, it is important to stop your brain from thinking so as to give it a meaningful break. Mental relaxation holds the key to protecting the brain from aging.

How do you concentrate your mind while walking? 

Pay attention to your breaths: breathing in and breathing out, as well as the pace or intensity of your breaths. Pay attention to the sensations of your body, such as the feelings of your soles and toes as your shoes touch the ground. Pay attention to the shifting of your body weight as you move from your right foot to the left foot. Just practice paying attention to what is happening to your body as you are walking. Or you can focus your attention on the surrounding, such as the buildings and people around you. 

No matter how concentrating or focused your mind is, compulsive or obsessive thoughts may find their way into your mind. You mind may remember what you need to say at the meeting or what you need to buy at the grocery store. They may sip through your consciousness without you inviting them. This, too, is natural. Just notice them, and then re-focus your mind on your breaths, your body movements, or the surrounding. Before long, you have mastered and controlled your mind. You feel very relaxed, and you have de-stressed your mind, thus protecting your brain from aging. 

Don't just walk! Walk with consciousness; walk with mindfulness; walk with concentration. Try this out the next time you walk. 

Also read my book Younger and Healthier for Longer to get the wisdom of anti-aging.

Stephen Lau
Copyright © by Stephen Lau


Sunday, November 11, 2018

Life Changes May Become Enlightenment


Life is forever changing. A static life is not worth living. Ironically enough, many people resist any change in their lives; they desire consistency and stability. Unfortunately, whether you like it or not, changes are inevitable as you continue to age. The only ways to cope with life changes is adaptability and acceptance.

Adaptability is changing the mind's perception of the change you confront, and act or react accordingly to the circumstances. This mental perception requires awareness, without which actions or reactions may not take place, because often times changes are slow, gradual, and even subtly imperceptible. Awareness means knowing why and how changes are taking place.

.“We need a still and composed mind
to see things with greater clarity.
Because trouble begins in the mind
with small and unrelated thoughts.
So, we carefully watch the mind
to stop any trouble before it begins.”
(Chapter 64, Tao Te Ching)

Acceptance is taking the responsibility of the results of the actions or reactions taken. Acceptance may not be easy, especially if you have a pre-conditioned mindset of expectation or comparing the condition before and after the change.

Both adaptability and acceptance requires wisdom -- the wisdom to know and understand that nothing is permanent because everything remains only with that very present moment, and that everything follows a natural cycle, such as success .

"Success and failure are no more than expressions of the human condition.
So, accept both gracefully and willingly, with no judgment, no preference.
The Creator loves us unconditionally, irrespective of our success or failure.
What is meant by “accept both gracefully and willingly”?
Success is avoiding failure; avoiding failure is seeking success.
Both originate from fear and pride: the sources of human suffering.
Seeing ourselves indiscriminately as everything, including success and failure,
we see not only the manifestations but also the mysteries of the creation."
(Chapter 13, Tao Te Ching)

Tao wisdom is profound human wisdom based on not acquisition of knowledge but self-intuition of the nature of things. Through this self-enlightenment, one become wise, and accordingly knows how to live one's life as if everything is a miracle. Click here to find out more about Tao wisdom.

Stephen Lau 
Copyright© by Stephen Lau

Friday, November 2, 2018

My Book Just Published




This newly published book is about the miracle of living.

“Anything” may be “everything” to you, but not to others, and vice-versa. That may explain the some of the difficulties in human relationships. Life is difficult because it is all about you, and not about others. Let go of “anything is everything” to you if you focus more on others as well.

“Everything is nothing” is a universal truth: nothing lasts, no matter how we wish they were permanent. Many of us are reluctant to accept this universal truth of the impermanence of all things in this world.



“Nothing is everything” is enlightenment of the human mind, which is profound understanding of the ultimate truths of self, of others, and of the world around.

This 100-page book explains with many real-life examples to illustrate the perceptions of “anything is everything”, “everything is nothing”, and “nothing is everything”—based on the ancient Chinese wisdom and the Biblical wisdom.

Get the wisdom to live your life as if everything is a miracle.

Click here to get your paperback copy.

Click here to get your digital copy.


Here is the outline of the book:


INTRODUCTION

ONE: ANYTHING IS EVERYTHING

The Meanings and the Interpretations
A Frog in a Well
Human Wisdom and Spiritual Wisdom
Oneness with All Life
Love and Forgiveness
Gratitude and Generosity
Sympathy and Empathy
Compassion and Loving Kindness

TWO: EVERYTHING IS NOTHING

Understanding Is Everything
The Mind and the Ego
Attachments and Illusions
Control and Power
Detachment and Letting Go
Impermanence and Emptiness

THREE: NOTHING IS EVERYTHING

The Paradox
The Way
The Miracle
The Enlightenment

APPENDIX A: TAO TE CHING
APPENDIX B: MINDFULNESS
APPENDIX C: MEDITATION
APPENDIX D: WORDS OF WISDOM
APPENDIX E: ABOUT THE AUTHOR